How to quickly break in a new rope for shibari and kinbaku

Showing result of conditioning on tossa juteHaving to ‘break in’ new rope almost every day, we needed a quick way to prepare new hemp and jute ropes for use in shibari and kinbaku.

This method of breaking in our new rope was developed after several months of trying many variations. Allowing yu to very quickly reduce the initial stiff feeling a new natural fibre rope posesess.  

We originally used a number of alternative methods obtained from other riggers around the globe, but eventually developed this method for dry preparation of natural fibre shibari/kinbaku ropes.  

The Jade Rope Quick Preparation Method

  1.  How to Condition Step 1Hold your suspension ring (or large carabiner) straight up and down (as if you were holding a microphone) 

    ... really quite straight forward ;)







     
  2. How to condition - Step 2Twist the rope in an anti-clockwise direction around the bottom side so that you make two complete turns, then pull a 30-40cm length through.








     
  3. How to condition - Step 3Pass the leading end of your rope around a beam (or fixed point) and then feed it back through your suspension ring. 










     
  4. How to condition - Step 4Make sure you enter on the same side of the ring as you exited, and ensure the turns around the top of your ring are also made in an anti-clockwise direction.
    (Your rope should always enter and exit on the same side of the ring)







     
  5. How to condition - Step 5Holding the leading end in place, pull back on the ring allowing the bottom section to feed through. 
    (For best effect, create drag by using your bottom two fingers to slow the speed in which the rope passes through the ring)








     
  6. How to condition - Step 6Using your other hand push the ring back towards the beam, while holding the rope ends taunt.









     
  7. How to condition - Step 7Grab hold of the section of rope now at the top of the ring and repeat steps 4 to 6 until all of your rope has past through the ring. 
    (If you have purchased particularly tightly laid rope – like our tossa jute – you may wish to put the length through a second time, however we only do this once and really like the end product) 

 

Why this quick method works when breaking in rope

The first time the new rope passes through the bottom of the ring, the anti-clockwise direction actually forces the strands to untwist slightly. The ring is then moved back and forth over any one section two more times during the overall process; re-tightening then re-loosening. That is before the rope is turned 180 degrees back upon itself. This time, when the rope travels back through the suspension ring it is being forced to twist back into a tighter lay. Because of the pumping action of the ring, one section of rope is ‘loosened’ four times, and tightened four times, returning the lay of the rope to ‘almost’ the same lay as it was in the starting position, however… the 180 degree turn is completed while the rope has been loosened making the rope flex further during the bend.

An added bonus is that the two ends of your rope are spared the full extent of the treatment. Experienced riggers will know that it is typically the ends and centre of your rope which wear or loosens first. You will notice that the rope is actually twisted and untwisted eight times in the preparation process, and this is achieved with just a few quick movements.  

This is not only the quickest method we know to break in new rope, but because the process returns the rope to it’s original lay this method also ensures there is absolutely minimal weakening of the rope. And this is the key reason why we have adopted this preparation method as our preferred way to break in new rope for shibari and kinbaku.