Kinbaku has retained many traditions of Hojojutsu, but not evolved towards torinawajutsu practiced by current day Japanese National Police. Kinbaku practitioners tend to pay more attention to functionality as a method of restraint. Two other common indicators are:  

  •  There is a preference to fix ropes using ‘weaves’ as apposed to knots 
  •  Rope is deployed with erotic intent, where the rigger often actively targets erogenous zones

These characteristics, do not define Kinbaku as a discipline, they are merely preferences that can be seen when observing the Kinbaku communities. As with all generalisations, individuals should not be judged against such criteria.

This section of the Jade Rope blog - Nawa-go (Rope Language) - is intended to provide valuable bondage knowledge. We will aim to create a resource of useful kinbaku techniques and include detial \'how to\' instruction.

Kinbaku shares a number of similarities with Shibari, both disciplines – when practiced at higher levels – tend to structure ties in a manner where the ropes themselves become pleasurable for the person being bound.

The reason behind a preference to avoid knots within the kinbaku discipline is commonly attributed to be relating back to the origins of Hojojutsu, where it was considered shameful for people of a higher status to be bound. In these instances the rope was applied in a manner where no knots were used. The desire to replicate ties from a previous era means that the approach from those times is also translated into modern work.